How one employer helped reduce mental-health-related disability leaves

A recent study by the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry showed that the economic burden of depression has increased to over $210 billion per year.1 Not only is depression in the workplace a huge financial cost, it also takes a toll on both the affected employee and his or her coworkers. In his latest blog post, […]

Take a team approach to mental health return-to-work plans

In any year, approximately 7 percent of the American workforce experiences a major depressive disorder.1 Even in the simplest of cases, returning to work after a mental health absence can be challenging due to an infinite number of variables that can interrupt the recovery process, including complex work interactions. As I’ve mentioned previously, helping an […]

Changing the company culture around accommodations

Recently, I was talking with a colleague about how far one company we work with has come in building a culture that supports employees who are dealing with a medical condition at work. Lack of a plan When we first started working with this company, there was no formal plan in place to help an […]

Why it’s important to shift your thinking when accommodating employees

As a former HR manager, I know the internal struggle you may often face when an employee experiences a medical condition at work. Because of your training, you’re hyper-focused on treating employees equally. From hiring practices to benefits administration, you know the parameters and federal rules that have been established to ensure your organization isn’t […]

Transitional work agreements: return-to-work solutions for employees

For an employee on a disability leave, returning to work is a huge step forward in their recovery. Not only does it signal that his or her health is improving, but it also signals a return to “normal” life. However, some employees may want to return to work, but might not be able to take […]

Case management: Building trust helps with accommodations

A common misconception among employees is that, if they reach out to the employee assistance program (EAP), their employer will find out about their health problems or see their medical records. While this isn’t true, employees may consider the EAP an extension of the employer instead of an employer-provided resource. Because of this misunderstanding, an […]

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